Pride and Prejudice Movie Reviews

The quotes below are from different sources giving reviews on the 2005 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. The reviews are to give insight on different viewers perceptions of the movie. These reviews include negative and positive comments, all supported with examples from the movie and or book.

“The sumptuous new screen adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” has so much to recommend it that it seems almost churlish to point out that its plucky, clever heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, played by Keira Knightley, is not exactly the creature described in the 1813 novel.” -New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/11/movies/marrying-off-those-bennet-sisters-again-but-this-time-elizabeth-is-a-looker.html?_r=0

“Fans of Jane Austen’s classic novel—as well as the millions who cherish the six-hour 1995 BBC miniseries starring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle—may well wonder at the point of yet another telling of this tale. But first-time feature director Joe Wright tells it so well that few Austen lovers will be complaining after taking it in.” –Plugged In

http://www.pluggedin.com/movie-reviews/prideandprejudice/

“These are the opening moves in Joe Wright’s new film “Pride & Prejudice,” one of the most delightful and heartwarming adaptations made from Austen or anybody else.” -Rogerebert

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/pride-and-prejudice-2005

“Screenwriter Deborah Moggach’s adroit version of Pride and Prejudice cheerfully satisfies the traditional demand for the conventions of bowing and bonnets and breeches and balls – these last held in rooms the size of the House of Commons debating chamber. It is a world in which swoon-inducing countryside is seen bathed in a golden sunset or the hazy dew of morning, in which there is hardly a footfall out of doors that does not dislodge a hen or a goose, and in which no door opens without a toppling entry of eavesdropping sisters.” -The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2005/sep/16/2

“This version was purported to be glossier yet grittier than former adaptations and was best-noted for the recruitment of rising star Keira Knightley to play Austen’s much-loved heroine Elizabeth Bennet.  But for all the cinematic flashiness of the new film, former adaptations of Pride and Prejudice—in particular the 1995 BBC TV series—have retained a larger, loyal and more vocal fanbase, raising the question:  was the 2005 Pride& Prejudice ultimately a case of style over substance?” -Jane Austin Society of North America

http://www.jasna.org/persuasions/on-line/vol27no2/stewart-beer.htm

“Anyone working up a good derisive snort at this movie’s tagline—“Sometimes the last person on earth you want to be with is the one person you can’t be without”—would do well to snort-suppress…” -New York Magazine

http://nymag.com/nymetro/movies/reviews/14965/

“Director Joe Wright has fashioned a totally captivating screen version of Austen’s comedy of manners. The screenplay by Deborah Moggach does a beautiful job conveying the romantic entanglements, the misjudgments, and the mishaps that ensue as the very rich mix with those they deem to be their inferiors. Wright has created two festive dance sequences that are filled with telling nuances about all the characters.” Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/films/reviews/view/10136

“In one of the best scenes, Elizabeth holds her own against the imperious Lady Catherine who tries to shame and humiliate her. And be sure to enjoy the scene where Elizabeth shares the happiest moment of her life with her loving father who has always found her to be his favorite daughter. Pride and Prejudice breathes new life into Austen’s characters and tugs at our heartstrings with its grand finale.” Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/films/reviews/view/10136

 

 

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